First, do your research: are there budget airlines unique to the country you're flying out of and where you're headed to? Booking with a budget Australian airline (Jetstar) from Sydney to Honolulu, then an American one from Honolulu to Montreal saved us over $400 each when flying back from Australia to Canada earlier this year. This allowed us to create a thrifty five-day stopover in Hawaii on our way back, which was less exhausting and a lot cheaper! Kiwi.com and AirWander are both great search engine for revealing cheaper routes like this that involve multiple airlines.
If you're really serious about experiencing this country, you'll find America's best barbecue in Austin, Texas. Or will you find it in Kansas City, Kansas? How about Memphis, Tennessee or Chapel Hill, North Carolina? And speaking of American institutions: Should you see the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C.; San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge; New York's Statue of Liberty; St. Louis' Gateway Arch; or Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills of South Dakota?
Indirect flights are the way to go. Although layovers can be a hassle - especially if you have several of them - flying indirectly to your location decreases the total cost of your flight. Direct flights are in high demand, and are therefore made more expensive by airlines. Keep at least one layover open as an option, and prepare to save more money by considering multiple layovers for a single flight.
No wonder, then, that Singapore jumped to the top spot in the rankings. The airline is in the midst of a dramatic fleet revitalization, with the introduction of Airbus A350s and Boeing 787-10s and the launch of major new long-haul routes such as Singapore to Newark and Los Angeles, both of which took place within the last month or so. The airline is also in the midst of delivery of its order of new Airbus A380s, on which passengers will find its latest business-class seats and its much-lauded new first-class suites.
If your country’s currency is currently strong compared to others around the world, search airfare in a country where the currency is weaker. For example, the US dollar is strong and the New Zealand currency is weak. I found a one-way flight from Australia to NYC for $1,000 USD but when I searched on the NZ version of the airline, I found the same ticket for $600 USD. It’s the same airline, same flight, and same booking class. It was just booked in a different currency. This tip does not always work, but it works often enough that it’s something worth trying if your currency is currently doing well.
No one likes to clutter up their inbox, but by signing up for mailing lists from airlines and search engines, you’ll be able to get updates about all the last-minute or special deals that are happening. This is one of the best ways to ensure you find a cheap flight. Why? Because they do all the work for you! Many times, the cheap flights are only available for 24 hours, and if you aren’t always checking the web for them, you will miss out on many of the super cheap deals. I would have missed out on a round-trip ticket to Japan for $700 USD (normally $1,500) or $500 flights to South Africa! Additionally, they offer frequent flier bonuses, and those deals have also gotten me free business-class tickets. These three websites are the best to stay on top of travel deals:
you are looking for.
We've all experienced the tiresome, repeated searching when trying to book the cheapest possible flights to any given destination. With endless search engines and continually fluctuating prices, the approach to frugal flight booking is overwhelming. Here's some key tips that will save you time, frustration and most importantly money when booking your next flight.
×